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Posts Tagged ‘Cost of Fear’

Finding Business Solutions in the Humanities

At most colleges and universities in the U.S., the schools of humanities and business traditionally have not crossed paths. While you might find business majors in humanities classes, mostly because they are required to take a certain number of electives, it is the rare humanities major who will enroll in a business course. The reason could have more to do with culture than interests. Business seems to draw people with a more fiscally conservative mindset, whereas the humanities tend to draw more liberal minded students. The BA’s and MA’s do not often mingle with the MBA’s.

However, the line dividing business and humanities is blurring. More and more businesses are looking to the humanities for employees or new perspectives on solutions, not only “hard skills,” such as marketing, communications, and graphic arts. Companies are increasingly seeking expertise in the social sciences — anthropology, sociology, and psychology. In 2011, at the iPad 2 launch, Steve Jobs said,

Fear Dynamics 101: Part 4, Reaping the Benefits of a Fear Audit

Welcome to the final part of my four-part series: Fear Dynamics 101. In Part One, “Defining Fear Dynamics,” I introduced the concept. In Part Two, “Recognizing the Warning Signs,” I illustrated several common symptoms of fear that arise in group settings, so you know what to look for. In Part Three, “Counting the Costs of Fear Dynamics,” I discussed the potential consequences of failing to address the fear factor in business. In this part, I encourage you to take the first step toward identifying and addressing fear in your organization and business deals — by conducting a fear audit.

A fear audit provides an objective analysis of interactions within an organization, between among parties involved in a business deal, or between an organization and its clients or vendors in order to identify and correct fear-driven behaviors and communications that often undermine business deals and that hinder performance and productivity. A fear audit is a four-step process, preferably conducted by an objective, third-party observer with expertise in fear dynamics:

Fear Dynamics 101 — Part Three: Counting the Costs of Fear Dynamics

Welcome to Part Three of my four-part series: Fear Dynamics 101. In Part One, “Defining Fear Dynamics,” I introduced the concept. In Part Two, “Recognizing the Warning Signs,” I illustrated several common symptoms of fear that arise in group settings, so you know what to look for. In this part, I discuss the consequences of allowing fear to govern business behaviors, relationships, and interactions.

I would not be discussing the problems associated with fear dynamics (the behavior and communication patterns that emerge during interpersonal interactions involving fear) if there were no costs that people and organizations suffer. Unfortunately, the potential costs of fear dynamics are quite substantial.

When fear operates unchecked or acknowledged, people often respond in the following ways: